LOADING PLEASE WAIT

MastHead

Rottweiler Puppies - 10 wks. old

About Rottweiler Puppies - 10 wks. old

Contact Rottweiler Puppies - 10 wks. old by clicking here.

About The Breed: Rottweiler

History
The breed is an ancient one, and its history stretches back to the Roman Empire. In those times, the legions travelled with their meat on the hoof and required the assistance of working dogs to herd the cattle. One route the army travelled was through Württemberg and on to the small market town of Rottweil.

This region eventually became an important cattle area, and the descendants of the Roman cattle dogs proved their worth in both droving and protecting the cattle from robbers and wild animals. It would be a brave villain who would try to remove the purse around the neck of a Rottweiler Metzgershund (Butcher's Dog of Rottweil).

However, by the end of the 19th Century, the breed had declined so much that in 1900 there was only one female to be found in the town of Rottweil. But the build up to the World War I saw a great demand for "police dogs," and that led to a revival in interest for the Rottweiler. Its enormous strength, its intelligence, and its ability to take orders made it a natural weapon of war.

From that time, it has become popular with dog owners, and in 1935 the breed was officially recognised by the American Kennel Club. In 1936, Rottweilers were exhibited in Britain at Crufts. In 1966, a separate register was opened for the breed.
Description
A Rottweiler is a medium-large, robust and powerful dog breed originating from Germany.

The breed is black with clearly defined tan markings on the cheeks, muzzle, chest, legs, and eyebrows. The markings on the chest should form two distinct upside-down triangles; a tiny patch of white in between is not acceptable for show dogs. The cheeks should have clearly defined spots that should be separate from the muzzle tan. The muzzle tan should continue over the throat. Each eyebrow should have a spot. Markings on the legs should not be above a third of the leg. On each toe should be a black 'pencil' mark. Underneath the tail should also be tan.

Nails are black. Inside the mouth, the cheeks may have black patches, although the tongue is pink. The skull is typically massive, but without excessive jowls. The forehead is wrinkly when the Rottweiler is alert.

A Rottweilers's eyes are a warm, dark brown—any other color may not be acceptable as part of the "pure breed". The expression should be calm, intelligent, alert, and fearless. The ears are small drop ears that lie flat to the head. 'Flying' ears are considered undesirable by some breeders. The coat is medium length and consists of a waterproof undercoat and a coarse top coat. It is low maintenance, although experiences shedding during certain periods of the year.

Naturally, Rottweilers are a tailed dog. Tails were originally removed to prevent breakage and infection that would occur when the tail became covered in mud and other debris collected from pastures and livestock. Today, many owners in U.S. decide to have the tails removed soon after the puppy's birth for purely cosmetic reasons. The tail is usually docked to the first joint. In the past, this was a commonly accepted practice, however recently many people, organisations and states of the USA have recognised it is cruel and unnecessary - e.g. it has been banned in the European Union.

The chest is deep and should reach the Rottie's elbows, giving tremendous lung capacity. The back should be straight; never sloping. According to FCI standard, the Rottweiler stands 61 to 68 cm (24-27 inches) at the withers for males, and 56 to 63 cm (22-25 inches) for females. Average weight is 50 kg (110 lb) for males and 42 kg (95 lb) for females.
General Information
Famous Rottweilers
Good Dog Carl book coverMuzzle/Scout and Gerta from Road Rovers
Good Dog Carl
"Snot" (from the National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation movie)
"Missy" of Joss Stone
"Max" from the Punisher comic book
"Dracula" of Phil Anselmo
"Kofi" from the movie Amores Perros
The unnamed satanic Rottweiler which protected Damien in the horror film The Omen
The unnamed Rottweiler guarding the cemetery in Pet Semetary
Triumph the Insult Comic Dog a puppet dog appeared from Late Night with Conan O'Brien and MTV2.
Killer the pothead rottweiler in Half Baked
Mirror-Universe Porthos in Star Trek: Enterprise (in the "normal" universe, Porthos is a beagle)
The unnamed Rottweiler kept as the family pet in Ferris Bueller's Day Off
Physicality
24 to 27 inches (male); 22 to 25 inches (female).
Personality
A well-trained and socialised Rottweiler can provide the right owner with a great deal of exercise and loving companionship. A badly trained, or insufficiently restrained Rottweiler can ruin childrens lives in seconds. A well trained Rottweiler makes an ideal attack dog. They are usually quick to learn and have a strong desire to please their owners. They are intelligent, to the point that they should not be left to their own devices, and are happiest when mentally stimulated. Despite this, they can also be strong willed at times, and should be taught in a firm, consistent manner. Rottweilers are playful animals, usually very excited at the first sign of fun. Rottweilers thrive on attention from their owners and need their people to be happy. If a Rottweiler has been neglected excessively, it will usually strive, creatively, to get the owner's attention.

The Rottweiler is not usually a barker: males are silent watchers who notice everything and are often quite stoic. Females, however, may become problem barkers in order to protect their den. In the event a dog feels threatened, they tend to go very still before attacking, and there may be no warning growl. This is one of the breed's characteristics that lends itself to the reputation of being unreliable. An observant owner, however, is usually able to recognise when the Rottweiler perceives a threat. When the dog barks, it is more of a sign of annoyance with external factors (car alarms or other disturbances) rather than threats.

The Rottweiler is typically a dominant dog, and they can resort to aggressiveness in unfamiliar situations. The Rottweiler's large size and incredible strength make this an important point to consider, and for this reason the Rottweiler is a breed that only experienced dog owners should consider. Rottweiler owners who don't understand the breed's nature can face significant problems in handling such dogs when they reach adulthood. Early socialisation with as many people, animals, and situations as possible is very important in order to produce a dog that is tolerant of strangers.

Aggression in Rottweilers is associated with boredom, poor handling, lack of socialisation, natural guarding tendencies and abuse. Owners are advised to neuter/spay the dog to reduce aggressive tendencies. Unneutered males can become male dog aggressive and hard to manage and are predisposed to some cancers. Unspayed females can become moody and difficult and predisposed to uterine problems and cancers.[1]

The Rottweiler Welfare Association offers the following advice for would-be Rottweiler owners:[2]

Like all dogs, the Rottweiler needs to be trained properly and controlled at all times

No-one should own a Rottweiler unless they are absolutely sure they can control it, and are willing and able to devote time and effort to teach the dog good basic manners

The Rottweiler has a natural guarding instinct. Do not do anything (for instance, rough play) to enhance this guarding instinct

No Rottweiler should be in the sole charge of a person such as a child who is not capable of controlling it

Any person who owns a dog should be aware that he will be devoted to and feel protective towards his household. This should be born in mind when children are playing, people arguing or visitors are calling

Third party insurance should be taken out on any Rottweiler that you own
Talents and Skills
Tracking, herding, watchdog, guarding, police work, carting, competitive obedience, and Schutzhund.

Welcoming a Rottweiler

Rottweiler For Sale Information - Buying your first Rottweiler can be overwhelming and PetsUnlimited.com is here to help. We've got Rottweiler breed backgrounds to help you make an educated decision as to whether a Rottweiler is right for you and your family. The right Rottweiler breeder or seller will always have the best interest of the Rottweiler in mind. This means they should give you the opportunity to visit their home and meet the Rottweiler in person, as well as take back the Rottweiler should you not be able to provide the level of care needed. ATTENTION: Be informed! Internet fraud is very real and rising every day. Be cautious and ask questions, ask to see pictures with the seller or adoption agency doing something you ask them to do, and never ever send cash or a money order. If something does not feel right, it probably isn't. Use the report this listing function to notify us of a potential problem with a user. Use the review feature to leave a review. Community policing is the best way to help deter scammers and those who do not have the animals best interest in mind.

Rottweiler Breeders

Responsible breeding is something we all need to support. To help prevent Rottweiler puppy mills and the inhumane treatment of Rottweilers, there are a few simple things everyone can do on both sides of the transaction. If geography permits, meet in person where the Rottweilers was born and raised. This provides an opportunity for the Rottweiler breeder to demonstrate their standards. Remember, it is up to both the buyer and Rottweiler breeder to be comfortable with each other to ensure that the Rottweiler has been treated properly and will have a safe and secure home in the future.

Contact Information

Contact
  • James Salisbury
  • 209-810-1170

Reviews

Write a review